la verdad es que debo irme y escapar de este lugar en que me invade la soledad aunque hayan persosnas a mi alredeor …. hay algo que falta que no puedo encontrar o que no deja que yo lo encuentre realmente he tratado de mil maderas pero nada es posible … irme es la mejor opcion … la mayoria d epersonas dicen 

"no escapes de tus problemas o de tus tristezas "…
pero debemos escapar de ellas escondernos porque esconderse es cubrir todo aquello que te da miedo … porque somo humanos y por mas que digamos yo sere valiente y enfrentare mis miedos no es cierto nos aferramos mas a cubrirlos que a enfrentarlo por eso … me ire 

sometime we should do bad thing for feel better but  what about if we do the right thing and latter feel bad ….
yesterday i do something i though i will never do but i feel so amazing when i do it but i know it was wrong 

astronomyandastrophotography
childrenofthisplanet:

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope snapped this picture of Mars on October 28 2005, within a day of its closest approach to Earth on the night of October 29. The large regional dust storm appears as the brighter, redder cloudy region in the middle of the planet’s disk. This storm, which measures 930 miles (1500 km) has been churning in the planet’s equatorial regions for several weeks now, and it is likely responsible for the reddish, dusty haze and other dust clouds seen across this hemisphere of the planet. Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Imager took this image when the red planet was 43 million miles (69 million km) from Earth. Mars won’t be this close again to Earth until 2018. Mars is now in its warmest months, closest to the Sun in its orbit, resulting in a smaller than normal south polar ice cap which has largely sublimated with the approaching summer.
Credit: NASA, ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Bell (Cornell University) and M. Wolff (Space Science Institute)

childrenofthisplanet:

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope snapped this picture of Mars on October 28 2005, within a day of its closest approach to Earth on the night of October 29. The large regional dust storm appears as the brighter, redder cloudy region in the middle of the planet’s disk. This storm, which measures 930 miles (1500 km) has been churning in the planet’s equatorial regions for several weeks now, and it is likely responsible for the reddish, dusty haze and other dust clouds seen across this hemisphere of the planet. Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Imager took this image when the red planet was 43 million miles (69 million km) from Earth. Mars won’t be this close again to Earth until 2018. Mars is now in its warmest months, closest to the Sun in its orbit, resulting in a smaller than normal south polar ice cap which has largely sublimated with the approaching summer.

Credit: NASA, ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Bell (Cornell University) and M. Wolff (Space Science Institute)

astronomyandastrophotography
string-theory:

Near the center of this sharp cosmic portrait, at the heart of the Orion Nebula, are four hot, massive stars known as the Trapezium. Gathered within a region about 1.5 light-years in radius, they dominate the core of the dense Orion Nebula Star Cluster. Ultraviolet ionizing radiation from the Trapezium stars, mostly from the brightest star Theta-1 Orionis C powers the complex star forming region’s entire visible glow.

string-theory:

Near the center of this sharp cosmic portrait, at the heart of the Orion Nebula, are four hot, massive stars known as the Trapezium. Gathered within a region about 1.5 light-years in radius, they dominate the core of the dense Orion Nebula Star Cluster. Ultraviolet ionizing radiation from the Trapezium stars, mostly from the brightest star Theta-1 Orionis C powers the complex star forming region’s entire visible glow.